carked

adj
1.
(of a situation) ruined or destroyed
2.
(of a person) exhausted, pooped This word may simply be an invention, or may be derived from croak, cocked (up) or, more plausibly, cack (excrement, shit, by analogy with poop). It is heard in Britain and Australia, but not in the USA.

Contemporary slang . 2014.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Carked\ it — Kicked the bucket. It hurt so bad I thought I had carked it …   Dictionary of american slang

  • carked it — Kiwi (New Zealand Slang) died, kicked the bucket …   English dialects glossary

  • carked it — died, kicked the bucket …   Kiwi (New Zealand slang)

  • carked — n. worry; distress, trouble v. worry; be concerned; make uneasy …   English contemporary dictionary

  • cark it — To die, as in don t tell the kids the budgie carked it. The origin is uncertain. Perhaps it is a play on the standard English word croak to die , or it may be a shortening of carcass. Cark it also means to fail or break down completely : my… …   Australian idioms

  • Euphemism — A euphemism is a substitution of an agreeable or less offensive expression in place of one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant to the listener, [ [http://www.merriam webster.com/dictionary/Euphemism Euphemism] Webster s Online… …   Wikipedia

  • The Broken God — is a science fiction novel written by David Zindell and published in 1992. It is the first novel of the trilogy A Requiem for Homo Sapiens. [Brown, Charles N.. [http://www.locusmag.com/2000/Issues/06/Zindell.html David Zindell: Back to Roots ]… …   Wikipedia

  • cark it — verb To die. The guy was running, then he had a heart attack and carked it …   Wiktionary

  • cark — vb Australian to die. The origin of the word is obscure; it may be a deformation of croak or of cack. Like other items of current Austral ian slang, the word has been introduced to Britain via TV soap operas. ► They break down in the middle of no …   Contemporary slang

  • cark it — vb Australian to die. The origin of the word is obscure; it may be a deformation of croak or of cack. Like other items of current Austral ian slang, the word has been introduced to Britain via TV soap operas. ► They break down in the middle of no …   Contemporary slang

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